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Wednesday, April 6
 

5:00pm

Rebecca Peabody Reception

Wednesday April 6, 2016 5:00pm - 6:45pm
Art Museum UW, 2111 E Willett Drive, Laramie WY

7:00pm

Keynote Speaker Rebecca Peabody

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Peabody

Rebecca Peabody

Head of Research, Getty Research Institute
Rebecca Peabody is Head of Research Projects & Programs at the Getty Research Institute. She earned a joint PhD from Yale University in the History of Art and African American Studies, and focuses her research on representations of race, gender, and nationality in twentieth-century American art and culture. Her scholarly publications include Consuming Stories: Kara Walker and the Imagining of American Race (forthcoming in 2016) - a literary... Read More →



Wednesday April 6, 2016 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Visual Arts Building UW, 2129 Willett Drive, Laramie WY
 
Thursday, April 7
 

9:00am

Buy and Save: How Social Businesses in Cambodia Package Charity for Sale
This study based on 101 interviews with clients and administrators at NGOs in Cambodia was undertaken to learn how social business ventures represent charitable efforts to donors and customers, and how those narratives compare to internal and community perceptions of NGO social business activity. Social businesses transmit a particular image of charity through each element of their business design. Pragmatic interests in job creation and alternative revenue streams are combined with aspirational statements about alleviating poverty, providing refuge, and changing the lives of Cambodian people. Social businesses attempt to ameliorate poverty by providing poor Cambodians with jobs and job-training. They create these jobs by establishing a commercial foothold in the tourist industry. This model is successful in that it provides tangible benefit to the client-employees of social-business NGOs. However, mimicry of for-profit business structures shields customer-donors from the realities of social-business models, which generally follow local Cambodian for-profit standards. The re-framing of tourist purchase as instantiated charity may create an additional perverse incentive for social businesses, since they must dissociate their products from the client-employee labor that is central to their model.

Speakers
JW

Jessica White

UWyo
I am a graduate student in the MFA program, specializing in creative nonfiction. My work concentrates on issues of gender identity, sexuality, and embodiment.



Thursday April 7, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

9:00am

Know Thyself: Revealing Sense of Self in Students with Learning Disabilities
The lack of attention around the emotional well-being of people with a Learning Disability is one of the huge social justice issues of our time as 50% of incarcerated juveniles qualify for an LD diagnosis. This presentation will bring awareness to the Social Justice issues around people with a LD.


Speakers


Thursday April 7, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

9:00am

Outside the Box: Finding Gender Beyond the Binary
The gender binary follows us everywhere. It determines various aspects of our lives, from our individual preferences to how we communicate. While many people pass as either male or female, gender is rarely as binary as it seems. In this workshop, we will explore what it means to go beyond binary gender stereotypes.

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Jo Miller

Sophie Jo Miller

Office Associate, Sr, University of Wyoming
I earned my B.A. in Communication at the University of Wyoming and my M.A. in Communication at Eastern New Mexico University in Portales, New Mexico. I am originally from Laramie, Wyoming. | | For the last seven years, the majority of my research has been focused on the LGBTQ community. I am interested in 1) how intimacy works within queer relationships vs. heteronormative relationships, and 2) how "passing" affects a person's place in... Read More →



Thursday April 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

9:00am

Taking Action with the Good Mule
Ten students from the University of Wyoming organized the 2016 Good Mule Conference, a project which helps Laramie-ites grow in the practice, reflection, and expression of social justice activism. During this workshop panel, each student will describe a project they have created, giving attendees the opportunity to take meaningful action.



Thursday April 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Family Room UW Student Union

9:00am

Teaching the Change: Laramie High School educators reflect on the evolution of human rights education and diversity acceptance from Matthew Shepard's murder to the present to future hopes.
Present and former Laramie High School educators and sponsors of clubs-- PeaceJam, and SALLY (formerly GSA)-- share the adult perspective of the inception, evolution, and future aspirations for the clubs and the community, and how these positive changes inspired them. This panel relates to the student/alumni presentation, "Being the Change."

Speakers


Thursday April 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Ballroom East UW Student Union

9:30am

Politics of Memory:Contrasting the Public and the Individual Memory the Rwandan Genocide
As scholars analyze acts of public memories of tragic events such as the Rwandan genocide, they combat the effects of politics in the process of memory. In the Rwandan case, pertaining to the genocide of 1994, there must be an acknowledgement that all victims and survivors deserve respect and acknowledgement. An inclusive memory of the tragic events is paramount for reconciliation and the abatement of future conflicts. This research examines the complexities in public memory vis-à-vis the Rwandan genocide in contrast with individual/private memory. Is there a possibility of disconnect between public and individual memory of Rwandans, particularly the Hutus about the genocide of 1994? To answer this question, this research will analyze the concepts of memory from various fields of study with the aim of finding distinctions between private, or as will be the case in this study, individual memory as contrasted with public memory. In addition to examining theories of memory, the research will explore how the Rwandan genocide is remembered publicly in contrast with the individual accounts. Similarly, an assessment of how the reconciliation process has affected remembering the genocide will be examined.

Speakers

Thursday April 7, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

9:30am

“Bridging the Divide – Engaging in dialog to foster a safe and inclusive community that respects and values the diversity of all members
This session details the Federally mediated efforts of leaders of Wind River Indian Reservation Tribes and two adjacent white communities to bring understanding, tolerance, and healing in the aftermath of the summer 2015 shootings of two American Indian men as they slept in a publicly funded detox center in Riverton.

Speakers
avatar for Timothy Rush

Timothy Rush

U Wyoming (retired)
BL

Burnett Lee Whiteplume

Northern Arapaho
Mr. Whiteplume, doctoral candidate in curriculum and instruction, is a longstanding tribal leader in health and education.


Thursday April 7, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

10:15am

"No Nos Queda de Otra": The Labor and Lived Experiences of Domésticas in Rural Wyoming
This study focuses on the domestic work that Mexican immigrant women perform and contribute to the town of Jackson, Wyoming. My objective is to share personal narratives of domestic workers on their labor. Thus, their lives are placed at the center of the project and analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Norma Lira-Perez

Norma Lira-Perez

Undergraduate Researcher, University of Wyoming
I was born in Rexburg, ID to a family of Mexican Immigrants. After my birth day, my family made the decision to move to Jackson WY in order to find economic stability for a family of seven. Thus, Jackson WY is home to me and my family. I will be graduating from UW this spring 2016 with a Social Sciences B.A. and a minor in Chicano Studies. I was admitted to the McNair Scholars Program in January 2015. I would like to thank Susan Stoddard and... Read More →


Thursday April 7, 2016 10:15am - 10:45am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

10:15am

Being the Change: Laramie High School GSA, SALLY, PEACEJAM, and AMNESTY students and alumni reflect on what they did to promote positive change in high school, in their post-high school lives, and their hopes for the future.
Alumni and members of Laramie High School humanitarian clubs- PeaceJam (+Amnesty), and SALLY (formerly GSA)-- share in person or via written statements how they promoted positive change in high school and after,and their future hopes- with a Q&A afterwards. This panel relates to the teacher presentation, "Teaching the Change."



Thursday April 7, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Ballroom East UW Student Union

10:15am

Refugees and Asylum Seekers Here and Abroad: Real People, Real Lives
Human rights violations have pushed millions of refugees and asylum seekers out of places like The Gambia and Iraq. While the issues of whom to admit are hotly debated, real people are in a suspended state of crisis, and means for a successful intervention and social justice do exist.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Muro

Denise Muro

Facilitator, Graduate Assistant, Soliya, University of Wyoming
I am a first-year master's candidate in the Global and Area Studies department at the University of Wyoming. I am also a facilitator with the Soliya Connect Program, which connects undergraduate students in the US, Europe, and the Middle East in deep conversation in efforts to build relationships and understanding. My current research focuses on the gendered discourses on refugees in Germany, how NGOs and other aid-providing agencies respond to... Read More →



Thursday April 7, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

10:15am

Subversive Science: A critical discussion of positivism and an approach for creating inclusive environments in science
The Scientific Method seeks reductionist observation of nature. With control of variables, hypotheses beg experimentation, which in turn begets more hypotheses. A tidy and controlled cycle, this way of studying nature is also exclusive and marginalizing. But alternative modes of teaching and doing science exist and these can create inclusive, liberating environments.



Thursday April 7, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Family Room UW Student Union

10:15am

Using the Game of LIFE to Explore White Fragility and Privilege: An Experiential Process
Who has ever played the game of LIFE? Earn some hard LIFE cards and engage in dialogues during this reflective experiential session exploring concepts of white fragility and privilege. Then create your own cultural genogram. Get ready to Spin and see what this presentation brings to LIFE for you!

Speakers


Thursday April 7, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

10:45am

Native American Mascot Controversy and Mass Media Involvement
The last 30 years , there has been national debate as to whether school and professional sports teams should use Native American Imagery as their mascots, nicknames, and/or logos. This presentation examines the use of Native American athletic imagery in media and viewpoints on media responsibility.

Speakers
AG

Avis Garcia

University of wyoming
Doctoral student in the Counselor Education and Supervision program. A member of the Northern Arapaho Tribe, who earned both a bachelors and masters degree from the University of Wyoming. An advocate for American Indians in education, domestic violence, and suicide prevention



Thursday April 7, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

11:30am

Lunch
Thursday April 7, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

12:00pm

Keynote Speaker Masha Gessen
Presentation Title: Refugees from the War on Queers
Recorded Session

Map to UW Student Union

Speakers
avatar for Masha Gessen

Masha Gessen

Author, Journalist, Carnegie Millennial Fellow
Masha Gessen is a Russian-American journalist. She started her career in the gay and lesbian press in the United States in the 1980s, then returned to Russia as a correspondent, and stayed for twenty years before the antigay campaign forced her to leave. She is the author of seven books of nonfiction, most recently "The Brothers: The Road to an American Tragedy," as well as the international bestseller "The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise... Read More →



Thursday April 7, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

1:15pm

Civic Innovation: where do you fit in?
Social justice begins with the individual. Through our actions and involvement we can create a community that fosters change and a culture that is a catalyst for social transformation; so let’s do it.

Speakers
EC

Emma Carlson

University of Wyoming



Thursday April 7, 2016 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

1:15pm

Remember the Land: Community Mapping Activity on Learning to Understand the Effects of Mega-Development Projects in Guatemala
In this hands-on community mapping activity, participants will learn the potential community impacts of resource extraction, identify with communities facing resource extraction struggles, and better understand the connections between ecological justice and indigenous rights - in Guatemala and in other parts of the world.

Speakers
CD

Christiane Dechert

Wyoming Guatemala Accompaniment Project
President, WYGAP | | WYGAP is a non-profit organization in the State of Wyoming. | The purpose of the Wyoming Guatemala Accompaniment Project is to act as a sponsoring community for human rights accompaniers employed by the Guatemalan Accompaniment Project (GAP) of Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala (NISGUA); furnishing such accompaniers with a stipend for their time in Guatemala and an audience in the State of Wyoming upon... Read More →



Thursday April 7, 2016 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

1:15pm

Counternarratives of Five Women Faculty of Color working in a homogeneous, rural small town university.
Couched in Critical Race Theory, Whiteness, and the racial contract, five women faculty of color tell our counternarratives. As racism and Whiteness delegitimized our work, our voices need to be out and heard to make visible the covert racial contract/hierarchy. We speak to transform unjust policies and practices within the university community.

Speakers
KT

Keonghee Tao Han

University of Wyoming
JL

Jacqueline Leonard

Director, University of Wyoming
TO

Tracey Owens Patton

University of Wyoming
Dr. Tracey Owens Patton is Director of African American & Diaspora Studies as well as a Professor of Communication in the Department of Communication and Journalism at The University of Wyoming. She earned her Ph.D. in Communication at the University of Utah.



Thursday April 7, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

1:15pm

Frontier Outsiders: Race, Gender, Criminality, and Sexuality in the “Equality State”
Via the experiences of young gay men confronting homophobic violence in Wyoming, criminalized female inmates enacting agency under correctional control, and UW female students of color speaking back to the White hegemonic order, our racially diverse, interdisciplinary panel takes to task the exclusionary forces at work in the “Equality State.”

Speakers
avatar for Austin Morgan

Austin Morgan

Austin is a Latino undergraduate attending the University of Wyoming where he studies communication and gender studies. His research interests include sexuality and gender in rural spaces, HIV/AIDS acquisition among rural populations, psychoanalysis, and memory in rural spaces. His current project involves Grindr-using, rural young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and their use of Grindr as a private space in which they can engage in intimacy... Read More →
TO

Tracey Owens Patton

University of Wyoming
Dr. Tracey Owens Patton is Director of African American & Diaspora Studies as well as a Professor of Communication in the Department of Communication and Journalism at The University of Wyoming. She earned her Ph.D. in Communication at the University of Utah.



Thursday April 7, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Family Room UW Student Union

1:15pm

Veterans Photo Voice

Using photos as a creative medium, Veterans can have their struggles, fears, and observations voiced publicly, and anonymously if they so choose.  This project is the beginning between Veterans recognizing and voicing their needs, and a public willing to help.


Speakers

Thursday April 7, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom East UW Student Union

1:45pm

Being a Kurd in Turkey.
Being minority in nationalist country where the language and the culture is forbidden. Growing up with identity conflict.

Speakers

Thursday April 7, 2016 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

1:45pm

West Side Stories: The Success of the Lincoln Community Center and a Continuing Journey of Social Justice in Laramie, Wyoming's West Side Neighborhood
If you stand in the public plaza at First and Grand, you can view a map of Laramie etched in granite, featuring a city that ends right there at the railroad tracks. Although Laramie's West Side neighborhood is clearly visible from that spot, the tracks etch a boundary both physical and psychological, separating what was once known as "Mexican Town." A thirty-year effort to rehabilitate the neighborhood's historic school as a community center offers insights and opportunities to examine social justice and our vision for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Cisnereros

Mary Cisnereros

Manager, Lincoln Community Center
I attended Lincoln Elementary school for kindergarten in 1978. Joined the very first Lincoln Community Center Board of Directors when I was only 13 years old along with my Precious Mother Elizabeth Vialpando. I am back now as the Lincoln Community Center Manager!!! I remember the day when you couldn't even walk through the Center because the building was so dilapidated and now we are proud to say that we serve an estimated 150,000 people a... Read More →


Thursday April 7, 2016 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

2:30pm

Autoethnographic Research and Writing for the Promotion of Social Justice
Autoethnography involves research and writing in which researchers’ embodied experience is connected to an exploration of social issues. This paper indicates how autoethnographic narratives can promote social justice and activism by encouraging readers to experience and examine issues both emotionally and intellectually. Examples of autoethnographic writing on disability are included.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Harkin

Alison Harkin

University of Wyoming
Alison Harkin is an assistant lecturer in Disability Studies, English, and Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Wyoming.



Thursday April 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

2:30pm

Disparity and Difference in Rwanda, 1962-1994
The 1994 Rwandan genocide is traditionally portrayed as a result of ancient tribal hatreds and ethnic tension between the Hutu and Tutsi. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the violence and ethnic animosity in Rwanda was partly driven by socioeconomic disparities such as lack of access to education.

Speakers

Thursday April 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballroom East UW Student Union

2:30pm

You Don't Look Indian Enough: the Political and Psychological Implications of Blood Quantum Laws
Tribal and federal blood quantum laws regulate tribal membership and use western conceptions of “Indianness” as a political tactic. These laws are controversial in and out of Indian Country. Many argue that they complicate tribal political sovereignty and individual cultural self-determination, but others believe these laws ensure that non-Indians cannot exploit tribal benefits.

Speakers
avatar for Hunter Callahan McFarland

Hunter Callahan McFarland

University of Wyoming
I am an undergraduate senior at the University of Wyoming studying Political Science and American Indian Studies. I am also the President of the American Indian Studies Alliance and a member of the Debate Team.



Thursday April 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

2:30pm

A Dialogue Group Workshop: Examining media portrayals of 2014-2015 Civil Rights events in the U.S. and Paris: A Dialogue Teaching Approach
Civil rights have returned as a “front and center” issue. In the U.S., civil rights demonstrations re-engage Americans on the streets and in legislative arenas. In Paris, terrorist actions have sparked what the media calls “sympathy demonstrations.” This workshop, in “group dialogue,” invites participants to reflect on media portrayals of these events.

Speakers
avatar for Mona C. Struhsaker Schatz

Mona C. Struhsaker Schatz

Professor, Division of Social Work
Dr. Schatz, Professor in the Division of Social Work, teaches in a range of policy and practice areas. She has worked internationally, supporting the growth of social work and social justice in emerging and transitioning democracies.


Thursday April 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Family Room UW Student Union

2:30pm

A Family's Journey: 20 Years in LGBTQ+ Advocacy
Dennis Shepard, father of Matthew Shepard and co-founder of the Matthew Shepard Foundation, reflects on the evolution of the LGBTQ+ movement since 1998, when his son’s death shocked a nation and inspired a new generation of activists.

Speakers
SM

Sean McEntee

Matthew Shepard Foundation
Sean McEntee is the communications associate and multimedia producer at the Matthew Shepard Foundation.



Thursday April 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

3:00pm

Laramie Trans Soul Rebel: My Life as a Trans Teen in Laramie
Coming out to my community wasn't easy, none the less while I was battling through High School. Come hear about my experience as a trans teen in Laramie, Wyoming, how I became an advocate, and what you can do to change your community.

Speakers
avatar for Rihanna Kelver

Rihanna Kelver

Club President, SALLY
I am a Laramie High School Senior and a transgender female. I'm a very active high school student and much of my activism is based within the LGBT community with emphasis in the transgender community. I have presented at the Shepard Symposium twice, and I have done anthropological research on the transgender and intersex communities. My most recent endeavor has included working with the ACSD1 school board on forming a transgender student... Read More →


Thursday April 7, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

3:00pm

Traditional Views of American Indian Education
This session reveals the challenges held by American Indian youth in education. The session will also discuss the importance of revisiting these challenges in order for American Indian youth, specifically Northern Arapaho youth on the Wind River Indian Reservation to be successful in the world of academia and educational justice.

Speakers
avatar for Aldora White Eagle

Aldora White Eagle

University of Wyoming
A doctoral student in the Education Administration Department. A member of the Norther Arapaho Tribe, who earned both a bachelors and masters degree from the University of Wyoming. And advocate for American Indian Education.


Thursday April 7, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

4:00pm

Keynote Speaker Janaya Khan

Speakers
avatar for Janaya Khan

Janaya Khan

International Ambassador for the #BlackLivesMatter Network
Janaya Khan, known as Future in the Black Lives Matter movement, is a Black, queer, gender-nonconforming activist, staunch Afrofuturist, social-justice educator and boxer based in Toronto. As the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Toronto, they are committed to Black liberation, transformational justice and indigenous sovereignty and operate through a Black transfeminist lens. Janaya’s work is underpinned by understanding the transformational... Read More →


Thursday April 7, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union
 
Friday, April 8
 

9:00am

How 21st Century Learning Skills is Linked to Service Work: Middle School Students' Perspective

Four different groups of students will share how they acquired 21st Century Global Learning Skills by completing service-based projects in their local and global communities.  A question/answer and discussion period will follow.




Friday April 8, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Ballroom East UW Student Union

9:00am

People's Institute Workshop: Undoing Racism/Community Organizing
Speakers
LH

Lauren Holtzman

Lauren Holtzman is the Logistics Manager and an Organizer/Resource Trainer with the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond.  As a staff member of the People’s Institute, Lauren coordinates the logistics for the Undoing Racism/Community Organizing workshops that the People’s Institute facilitates around the country.  Born in New York and raised in New Jersey, Lauren was introduced to the People’s Institute... Read More →
AJ

Aubry Jeanjacques

Aubry Jeanjacques has worked with The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond since the summer of 2002 as a youth organizer. Aubry has moved from a participant in The People’s Institute Freedom School at age15, to the Director of that program. The Freedom School is a youth program that focuses on undoing racism and developing young folks to become strong community organizers. He is a Community Organizer and Core Trainer with The... Read More →


Friday April 8, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

9:00am

PLAN Zero Waste Workshop

The Post Landfill Action Network (PLAN) is a non-profit supporting student leaders working toward Zero Waste on their college and university campuses across the country. We will speak to the inefficiency of current waste disposal systems and the social and environmental injustices that this system propagates. We address these issues by highlighting the successes and challenges of Zero Waste initiatives on some our member campuses, and how you can take these program ideas back to your own campus community for greater community engagement, and, ultimately, to reach Zero Waste!



Friday April 8, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Family Room UW Student Union

9:00am

Safe Zone Workshop

Safe Zone is a program geared towards creating an inclusive environment for the LGBTQIA community. This program aims to educate individuals on issues related to the LGBTQIA community and provides tools for participants to become allies. This workshop will specifically focus on gender identity and explore definitions and components of lived experiences from individuals who are gender minorities. Furthermore, participants will learn what it means to be an LGBTQIA ally by understanding privilege and how to create a “safe zone” for members of the LGBTQIA community.


Speakers
RE

Rob Essaf

Program Advisor-Safe Zone, University of Wyoming-Campus Activities Center


Friday April 8, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

10:15am

CANCELLED: Learning from our mistakes in order to bring about social justice.
As educators we often make mistakes that help us to bring social justice around us. The presenters come from different race, background and discipline. In this session they aim to share their narratives how they failed to recognize the issue of social justice and ultimate learning outcome from their wrong judgment. 

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Weatherford

Jennifer Weatherford

Lecturer Professional Studies, UW
Qualitative research, statistics, and bracketing our preconceived notions so that we can experience the essence of a phenomenon. . . . or, actually, please talk to me about anything and everything.



Friday April 8, 2016 10:15am - 10:45am
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

10:15am

People's Institute Workshop: Undoing Racism/Community Organizing
Speakers
LH

Lauren Holtzman

Lauren Holtzman is the Logistics Manager and an Organizer/Resource Trainer with the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond.  As a staff member of the People’s Institute, Lauren coordinates the logistics for the Undoing Racism/Community Organizing workshops that the People’s Institute facilitates around the country.  Born in New York and raised in New Jersey, Lauren was introduced to the People’s Institute... Read More →
AJ

Aubry Jeanjacques

Aubry Jeanjacques has worked with The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond since the summer of 2002 as a youth organizer. Aubry has moved from a participant in The People’s Institute Freedom School at age15, to the Director of that program. The Freedom School is a youth program that focuses on undoing racism and developing young folks to become strong community organizers. He is a Community Organizer and Core Trainer with The... Read More →


Friday April 8, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

10:15am

PLAN Zero Waste Workshop

The Post Landfill Action Network (PLAN) is a non-profit supporting student leaders working toward Zero Waste on their college and university campuses across the country. We will speak to the inefficiency of current waste disposal systems and the social and environmental injustices that this system propagates. We address these issues by highlighting the successes and challenges of Zero Waste initiatives on some our member campuses, and how you can take these program ideas back to your own campus community for greater community engagement, and, ultimately, to reach Zero Waste!

 



Friday April 8, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Family Room UW Student Union

10:15am

Safe Zone Workshop

Safe Zone is a program geared towards creating an inclusive environment for the LGBTQIA community. This program aims to educate individuals on issues related to the LGBTQIA community and provides tools for participants to become allies. This workshop will specifically focus on gender identity and explore definitions and components of lived experiences from individuals who are gender minorities. Furthermore, participants will learn what it means to be an LGBTQIA ally by understanding privilege and how to create a “safe zone” for members of the LGBTQIA community.


Speakers
RE

Rob Essaf

Program Advisor-Safe Zone, University of Wyoming-Campus Activities Center


Friday April 8, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

10:45am

Unites Us Or Divides Us: What is the state of American Racial Relations Post-“Black Lives Matter”
The question of, “Do Black lives have value in the United States?” to the forefront of public discourse in American. The question about a life’s value, particularly Black lives, is multifaceted because of how easily it implicates various parts of historical, systemic and cultural issues that exist in American society.

Speakers


Friday April 8, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom East UW Student Union

11:30am

Lunch
Friday April 8, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

12:00pm

Keynote Speaker Omowale Akintunde

Speakers
avatar for Omowale Akintunde

Omowale Akintunde

Associate Professor, University of Nebraska
Dr. Omowale Akintunde is renown as a public intellectual, academician, and Emmy-Award winning filmmaker. The critically acclaimed writer/producer/director is a graduate of the conservatory program in filmmaking at the New York Film Academy. His first feature film, "An Inaugural Ride to Freedom," won the 2010 Emmy Award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for Best Documentary-Cultural. His very first short film, "Mama... Read More →



Friday April 8, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

1:15pm

Gang Life: The "Convo" (conversation)

Beginning in their teens and for many years thereafter, Drettie & Pee (Sheria Hicks and Pernell Hines) were members of the notorious “Bloods” street gang in northeast Denver. Now, not far removed from gang life and prison, having grown tired of the violence and death, Drettie & Pee work tirelessly as outreach workers talking and listening to young gangbangers.

Come here Drettie and Pee share their stories, current work, and the role that race plays in gangs.


Speakers



Friday April 8, 2016 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

1:15pm

Human Trafficking in Wyoming
Human trafficking is a form of slavery that is a multibillion-dollar global industry. Cases of trafficking exist in all 50 states. In January 2016, two college-aged women were rescued from human trafficking in Rawlins, Wyoming. The purpose of this session is to tell their story, broaden awareness, and promote prevention.

Speakers
JL

Jacqueline Leonard

Director, University of Wyoming



Friday April 8, 2016 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Family Room UW Student Union

1:15pm

From Human To Humane: The Importance of Transcendent Dignity
This interactive session begins with understanding prejudice as a human phenomenon, which is evident in all of us. It continues in describing the need for awareness of the indirect forms of discrimination--invisibility, labeling, concurrent expectations. It concludes with transforming ways to celebrate our uniqueness and affirm our transcendent dignity.

Speakers
DE

David E. Faris

independent
DS

Dr. Sally Palmer

Lecturer in Religious Studies, Univ. of Wyoming
Moderator: Dr. Sally Palmer teaches in Religious Studies and has given presentations on social justice at the Shepherd Symposium, State of the Rockies Symposium, and Iliff's Thought Conversations of Religious Leaders. Her specializations are eco-justice, poverty, and interfaith dialogue. | Her work at UW includes: Religion and Science in Dialogue, Ecocentrism--Where Religion and Science Meet, Beyond Life and Death, and Nature and Spirit... Read More →



Friday April 8, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

1:15pm

CANCELLED: Elevating Diversity in University and Professional Settings: Moving from Diversity Observation to Diversity Engagement
Diversity is critical in both university and professional settings in order to create rich dialogue and exchange. Exposure to diverse people, thinking, beliefs, and knowledge offers people opportunities for personal introspection. Furthering diverse exposure toward diverse engagement creates deeper understanding for people to navigate their world experience. Creating opportunity for challenging yet appealing engagement in diverse situations is critical in creating more open learning environments.

Speakers

Friday April 8, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

1:45pm

"Telling My Story Because It Needs to Be Told”: A Photo-ethnography with Denver Women in the Sex Industry
The human qualities of sex workers are often overlooked or ignored. The harsh realities of the industry overshadow individuality. Drug abuse, crime, poverty, mental illness, or desperation are most emphasized. This photo ethnography focuses on Denver female sex workers as ordinary people rather than the stigmatized and sensationalized mainstream media presentation.  

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Perkins

Wendy Perkins

Wendy Perkins is full-time staff support for African American and Diaspora Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, and Latina/o Studies. She is also a Communications and Journalism graduate student.



Friday April 8, 2016 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

1:45pm

Designing Monuments to Keep Memories Alive: How Should We Memorialize Victims of Hate Crimes?
How should we pay tribute to those killed in acts of hateful violence? By examining tragedies and memorial efforts specific to Wyoming, like the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885 (28 Chinese miners killed) and Matthew Shepard’s murder over a century later, this session explores the aspirations and challenges of creating meaningful memorials. 

Speakers
avatar for Luling Osofsky

Luling Osofsky

Lecturer, Dept of Mechanical Engineering and Synergy First Year Seminars, University of Wyoming
I currently teach writing to engineering majors, and recently taught a first year seminar on activist art in America, from 1960 to the present. I'm interested in the architecture and design of memorials-- and the many choices we make, consciously or not, in our efforts to remember or forget.


Friday April 8, 2016 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Family Room UW Student Union

2:30pm

Disrupting the Machine: Reflecting on America’s Higher Education
This presentation is a personal narrative reflection of our experiences in higher education from undergraduate studies to graduate school and beyond. Through a lens of social justice we are reconstructing what successful higher education has the potential to be.

Speakers
avatar for Brody Tate

Brody Tate

Graduate Assistant, Loyola University Chicago



Friday April 8, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Family Room UW Student Union

2:30pm

Intervening in the Itinerary: Contemporary Immigration Debates and the History of Labor Migration in England
On November 30th, 2014 the English newspaper The Independent reported that David Cameron, the British prime minister, had “been forced to retreat” on a speech given on November 28th, 2014 to Parliament regarding immigration to the United Kingdom from European Union member states. While expectations from Conservative MPs had included a call for “caps” on the number of migrants, the speech instead called for “tougher and longer re-entry bans for all those who abuse free of movement including beggars, rough sleepers, fraudsters and people who collude in sham marriages.” The “freedom of movement” for labor has been an issue in England and Europe's history dating to the rise centralized government during the Early Modern era. The link between renaissance English fears of  “masterless men,” “sturdy beggars,” “traveling rogues” and “unsettled” or “displaced” labor is well documented (see Fumerton, Slack, Kunze, McIntosh, Brundage, Clark et al.). Cameron's targeting of "beggars, rough sleepers, and fraudsters" reflects centuries of rhetoric regarding the "'deserving' versus the 'idle' poor."  Less has been written on the rise of state power and its purposeful intervention in labor through poor and vagrancy laws as a state resource, before the rise of industrial capitalism. The purpose of my research is to document the link between specific laws and instances of their selective enforcement restricting/policing the mobility of the most “valuable” labor pool (as the highest paid class of “casual” labor) of young men between the ages of 14 and 40 and the rhetoric of "deserving poor" in English law and policy. This body of “unskilled” labor was rightfully regarded as having the most potential for violence and disruption in law and the public consciousness but also reflected a necessary agricultural and military resource for the state. As changes and challenges in the early modern economy necessitated alterations in government financing and taxation, the bureaucratic “paper surveillance” of potential labor resources increased apace with these adaptations. The history of the English state's policies regarding "freedom of movement" and labor are intrinsicaly linked to contemporary concerns expressed by Cameron: "(But) freedom of movement has never been an unqualified right, and we now need to allow it to operate on a more sustainable basis in the light of the experience of recent years."

Speakers


Friday April 8, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballroom East UW Student Union

2:30pm

Social justice teaching for global and intercultural awareness: Lessons from designing and implementing an international service-learning course
This study focuses on the experience of designing and implementing an international service-learning course. I provide my perspective on how developing and implementing such a course has helped me develop professionally as a faculty of color who teaches for global social justice and intercultural awareness in a predominantly white institution.

Speakers


Friday April 8, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

2:30pm

Trans People in Queer Spaces: the fight for trans rights
While included in the LGBTQ acronym, trans people are often forgotten or left out of queer activist spaces. This presentation will try to focus on why trans rights are still relevant to the LGBT community at large - and what trans people have to offer the movement. 

Speakers


Friday April 8, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

2:30pm

How Can I Help? Assessing Abilities in Allyship for More Inclusive Social Action
Participants will discuss issues of privilege, bias, domination and subordination, and barriers to allyship. Focused discussion, reflective analysis, and the identification of allyship guidelines will be utilized. Participants will be provided resources to measure their current skills regarding allyship, and steps for increasing in thoughtful allyship in their communities.

Speakers
BL

Breann Lamborn

Assistant Professor/OT, University of North Dakota



Friday April 8, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

3:00pm

Immigration and Alienation: The Largely Missing Finns of Kiruna, Sweden

A free movement of labor across European national borders? It is a contemporary European battle of major proportions made more conflictual with the current, great surges of refugees and migrants from war-torn areas in the Middle East. This is “the largest movement of people that Europe has seen since 1945,” according to Financial Times in September 2015. In my project, too, I am concerned with a movement of people in Europe, but the time, place, economic and political conditions, and prevailing ideology and practices are of a different sort. I focus on the “the jewel in the Nordic cooperation” after WW II, the 1954 agreement on a joint Nordic labor market – a free movement of labor across the Nordic borders -- between Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and with Finland joining in 1955. This joint labor market “became a success with citizens,” the Nordic Labour Journal wrote as late as in 2014, with its “greatest impact on the relationship between Finland and Sweden.” True? I look at Finns who migrated to work at the Kiruna iron mine in northern Sweden beginning in the mid-1950s. These were unskilled laborers who moved from a fairly similar economy and language environment with many Kiruna natives speaking Meiänkieli, a Finnish-Swedish cognate language. Did, as some researchers claim about the close connection between cultural-linguistic similarities and better immigrant adjustments into “host countries,” these Finnish-speaking immigrants adjust better to a northern Swedish environment that included Meänkieli speakers and culture? No. My Kiruna case study of these Finns and their lesser cultural-linguistic distance points instead to their becoming a largely socially isolated and unnoticed ethnic group of Kiruna, Sweden.


Speakers
RB

Ruth Bjorkenwall

Assistant lecturer, University of Wyoming
Ruth Bjorkenwall, a sociologist with the UW Global and Area Studies program, studies labor migration, state power, agency, and the social safety net in the Nordic countries of Europe.


Friday April 8, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom East UW Student Union

3:00pm

Target Market Selection and Social Justice: What We Have Learned in the Past 20 Years
In today’s high-tech, instant-gratification world, marketing is the mechanism to join consumers with products and services. While efficient targeting of interested consumers is important, questions of ethics and social justice sometimes arise. This study examines the literature on ethics in target market selection toward a socially just end.

Speakers
avatar for Terri Rittenburg

Terri Rittenburg

Associate professor, University of Wyoming
Terri Rittenburg is Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of Wyoming. She received bachelors, masters, and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Recent publications have appeared in the Journal of Macromarketing and the Journal of Business Ethics. Her primary research interests are in macromarketing issues and marketing ethics.


Friday April 8, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Big Horn Room UW Student Union

3:00pm

Toonen to Today: Wins and Walls in Two Decades of Human Rights Based Sexual Orientation Litigation
This presentation highlights major milestones in international and national human rights litigation involving sexual orientation over the last two decades, then identifies significant obstacles that remain. In particular, the presentation explores what recent increases in stigma, discrimination and draconian laws regarding same sexual relations in much of Africa mean for a rights-based approach to justice.  

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Alexander

Melissa Alexander

Associate Professor, University of Wyoming College of Law



Friday April 8, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

3:00pm

What Factors Negatively and Positively Impact the College Experiences of Active Duty and Military Veterans?
This presentation reports preliminary findings of an exploratory qualitative study that highlights the experiences of active duty and military veteran students and factors they perceive influence their pursuit of higher education. Recommendations to increase the likelihood of current and former military students’ academic success are provided.

Speakers
HG

Hannah Ginn

University of Wyoming
Hannah Ginn is a graduate student in social work at University of Wyoming.


Friday April 8, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Family Room UW Student Union

9:00pm

Friday Night Fever with Mohammed Bilal

Mohammed Bilal is a diversity consultant, musician, poet and writer. As the current Executive Director at the African American Art and Culture Complex in San Francisco, Bilal travels across the world to educate on current social and diversity issues. With his Master’s in Diversity Studies, Bilal creates diversity awareness through hip-hop. He has collaborated with Santana, The Ohio Players, Michele Shocked, Public Enemy, Ben Harper, De La Soul, Goapele, Martin Luther, and Primus.


Map to UW Student Union

Speakers
avatar for Mohammed Bilal

Mohammed Bilal

Mohammed Bilal is best known as "the even-tempered, dread- locked rapper guy” on MTV's Real World III: San Francisco. He is also a diversity consultant, a musician, a poet, and an extraordinary writer who educates audiences about some of today’s greatest social problems. As facilitator of over 300 diversity presentations and workshops worldwide, his clients have included Lucent Technologies, Progressive, Boston College, Friends... Read More →



Friday April 8, 2016 9:00pm - 10:30pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union
 
Saturday, April 9
 

8:30am

GSA Day: Coffee, Donuts, Meet, Greet, Registration
Saturday April 9, 2016 8:30am - 9:15am
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

9:30am

GSA Day. Be You: A collection of individual and collaborative projects by East High School GSA members
With our theme of "Be You," we highlight the efforts of our members to promote understanding of the LGBTQ community. This has occurred through individual student projects in their academic classes, student participation in other clubs and organizations, and through the efforts of our GSA. We are demonstrating the breadth of our voice in our school community.

Speakers


Saturday April 9, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Ballroom East UW Student Union

9:30am

GSA Day: Suicide Risk and Prevention Discussion for LGBT Youth
  1. Introduction – including creating safety to talk about a sensitive topic and discussion around language we use to discuss suicide
  2. Discussion - facts about depression and suicide among LGBT Youth
  3. Discussion - warning signs and risk factors surrounding suicide in LGBT Youth
  4. Review ICARE Model of Intervention (Inquire, Connect, Refer) - how to talk to someone who might be depressed or suicidal and how to connect them to help
  5. Role-play having an ICARE intervention
  6. Wrap-up/Questions

Speakers
EG

Eirin Grimes

UW Counseling Center
JU

Jason Uitterdyk

Laramie High School


Saturday April 9, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

10:45am

GSA Day. Celebrating our past 20 years, making our mark on the next 20 years
Central High School GSA is honored to celebrate with the Shepard Symposium 20 years of work dedicated to improving the lives of others. Our presentation will be interactive allowing for participants to be engaged in a variety of activities focused on celebrating how far we have come and how far we will go.

Speakers
EE

Elizabeth Edington

LCSD #1 - Central High School
Central High School's GSA was founded in October 2013 by me and my son. Since its founding the GSA has grown to over 20 members and has been active in promoting appreciation of diversity.



Saturday April 9, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Ballroom East UW Student Union

10:45am

GSA Day. Celebrities' influences on LGBTQIA Social Equality
LGBTQIA Celebrities have had powerful impacts on movements contributing towards social justice issues in the past two decades. Through presentation and interactive activities, we will explore how celebrities have made powerful impacts in the past two decades. The Jackson Hole High School Gay Straight Alliance invites you to attend.

Speakers
avatar for Adele Farag

Adele Farag

Jackson Hole High School GSA



Saturday April 9, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Senate Chambers UW Student Union

12:00pm

Lunch & Panel. Social Justice and You: The Voices of Wyoming Advocates for Change.
Social Justice and You: The Voices of Wyoming Advocates for Change. Panel Discussion: Rihanna Kelver, Robert West, Bria Frame, Melanie Vigil

Speakers
avatar for Rihanna Kelver

Rihanna Kelver

Club President, SALLY
I am a Laramie High School Senior and a transgender female. I'm a very active high school student and much of my activism is based within the LGBT community with emphasis in the transgender community. I have presented at the Shepard Symposium twice, and I have done anthropological research on the transgender and intersex communities. My most recent endeavor has included working with the ACSD1 school board on forming a transgender student... Read More →



Saturday April 9, 2016 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Ballroom Central UW Student Union

1:45pm

Kara Walker Exhibit at the UW Art Museum - Guided Tour
UW Art Museum

Saturday April 9, 2016 1:45pm - 4:00pm
Art Museum UW, 2111 E Willett Drive, Laramie WY

1:45pm

Movie: Matthew Shepard is a Friend of Mine
Viewing of the movie "Matthew Shepard is a Friend of Mine", followed by a trip to the Matthew Shepard Memorial Bench with a discussion.

Saturday April 9, 2016 1:45pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom East UW Student Union

5:00pm

GSA Dance

Saturday April 9, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Laramie Railroad Depot 1st and Kearney Street, Downtown Laramie

9:00pm

Shepard Symposium Dance: Woodland Masquerade Party
DJ by Party Pros.  Cash bar by Crowbar. Raffle Prizes!
Map to Laramie Railroad Depot


Saturday April 9, 2016 9:00pm - Sunday April 10, 2016 12:00am
Laramie Railroad Depot 1st and Kearney Street, Downtown Laramie